Learning Experiments on MDN

At the bottom of this post, I ask: Who should I connect with to learn more about the state of the art in professional web developer education? Read on to see why, and answer if you can.

Mark Surman, Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation, wrote on his blog recently about the Foundation’s ambitious plans to make Mozilla “a global classroom and lab for the citizens of the web”. He briefly mentioned MDN, the product I manage:

Given what we’re already doing, being bold doesn’t need to involve huge new investments. In fact, it can start simply with being more clear and assertive the work we already do. Not just with Webmaker, Hive and Maker Party, but also with user education in Firefox, Mozilla Developer Network, ReMo program and our research and fellowships programs. What I’m talking about starts with making these things stronger — and then telling a clear story to ourselves and the world about how they add up to a coherent whole. That’s what I want us to start doing in 2015.

He’s right: Mozilla has been teaching the web for years through numerous channels. Along with our explicit efforts, Mozilla’s policy, community development, content, and product features all help people learn how the web works and how to use it effectively. We can confidently state our intent to do more of that.

MDN has always – explicitly – been a learning resource. When the MDN wiki launched in 2005 it was billed as “a Mozilla project dedicated to providing documentation, education, and community for developers of all types.” Now MDN helps millions of developers every month to understand the core technologies used for building web sites.

Mozilla’s other efforts in education to date have focused on building local networks, teaching web literacy and creating enthusiasm for web technology among young people and non-developers. MDN complements this work because it provides similar (but distinct) opportunities to an audience of intermediate and advanced web developers. A significant majority of MDN visitors – 70% in recent surveys – are professionals in the field.

Along with the Foundation group, MDN will spend much of 2015 making our educational role explicit. For example, last week the MDN content team quietly launched a new learning area on MDN. This learning content represents a large and ongoing effort by many volunteers and staff contributors to create new pathways into the advanced web topics MDN  covers. Like most wiki content, it is a work in progress; in 2015 the learning content will make great leaps forward. (Also like most wiki content, you can contribute your expertise to make it better.)

We recognize that learners learn in very different ways. Some easily absorb the technical documentation MDN has always provided; others need a different format, or different materials, to help them grasp these complicated subjects. But what additional formats and materials can MDN contribute to these learning experiences? Like the  learning area, this is new territory for MDN. So in 2015 we’ll undertake a variety of experiments to help understand how MDN can best help people grow their web development skills and become professionals and adepts at making the web the world needs.

Here are some naive examples to show what I mean by “experiments”:

  • Videos are a common medium among sites teaching things. Are they effective? Would MDN’s audience appreciate them? Should we experiment with integrating or linking to more video content on MDN?
  • There are lots of online schools teaching web development. Are any of them doing an incredible job of it? Should we talk to that school about collaborating to give MDN users access to its programs?
  • MDN can facilitate local learning groups. Would that be valuable? How could we do that? How would we know it was working?
  • etc.

I will solicit and explore such experiments here, on this blog, and will recommend the most compelling opportunities for more work in 2015. I encourage anyone with feedback or questions to discuss in comments, reach out to me directly, or respond in kind on their own blog (and let me know about it).

Here is my first question for all the learners and teachers out there: Who should I connect with to learn more about the state of the art in professional web developer education? Twitter handles, blog URLs, and introductions welcome.

Learning Experiments on MDN